One of the strangest passages in the New Testament is about Lazarus, one of Jesus’s good friends John 11: 1-44. Christ waits until after Lazarus dies to visit his family and, then, bring him back to life. I see the miracle aspect as I see many of Christ’s miracles – he was empathetic and if He had the ability to heal, by God, he was going to do so.

He healed the blind man. The sick child. But, the key point of this story I want to focus on is piece is the authenticity of the situation. When Jesus arrives at Lazarus’s home, he was greeted by many, but, according to most interpretations, he had to summon Mary. One can imagine Mary feeling angry, or forlorn. After all, where was this miracle worker, this savior, this one she had honored when her brother was sick? Why didn’t He come when they sent messengers for him? 

And what did Mary say when she saw him?

Did she praise him with hollow phrases or memorized salutations?

Did she say, “Great one, I have faith in you! From my brother’s death, your will is done!”

Did she say, “Our God is an awesome God! You are the best!”

No, she said, and one can imagine quite flatly or accusingly: “Lord, if you had been here, my brother would not have died.”

Wow. Period.

How did Jesus react? Did he strike her down? Did he admonish her? Did he tell her to be quiet or not to question him, his motives, his timing?

No, he cried.

There is something in that when it comes to truth-telling. Christ can handle our honesty. Our sadness. Even our accusations. That is stated throughout the Bible in different ways, but I find here it resounds with me on a matter-of-fact level. This is not David weaving poetry in anguish or Job questioning the very nature of the cosmos. This is a simple, almost stoic, accusation as Mary, in essence, says, “Where were you?”

And then the reaction. What did Jesus do? He cried. He did not preach a sermon at that moment. He did not tell her to rejoice. He cried. The truth is He cries with us. He is empathetic. He loves us. Even though there are mysteries that the finite mind cannot grasp, even though His Ways are not always Our Ways, He cares. And He is willing to listen. He does not strike us down for our honesty. We can tell the truth.